print disintermediation

While independent newspapers and magazines are in deep distress, business-sponsored print publications seem to be flourishing.  Costco Connection, for example, is a monthly lifestyle magazine for Costco members.   The Sept. 2010 issue offers 72 pages chock-full of advertisements.  Its masthead shows a large, traditional print organization (managing editor, associate editors, assistant editors, copy editor, production … Continue reading print disintermediation

newspapers and magazines: bigger problems than the Great Depression

U.S. print newspaper and magazine advertising revenue is falling sharply.  In the first quarter of 2009, newspaper print advertising revenue declined 30% compared to the first quarter of 2008 ( $5.92 billion in 2009 Q1; $8.42 billion in 2008 Q1).  Magazine rate-card-reported advertising revenue, which does not take into account discounting likely to be more … Continue reading newspapers and magazines: bigger problems than the Great Depression

media innovation doesn't change shape of ad spending distribution

Looking at the top U.S. magazine advertisers from 1913 to 1929 shows a lot of familiar brands.  Proctor & Gamble, the leading magazine advertiser in 1913, was also the largest U.S. advertising spender from 1963 to 1986 and 1991 to 1996.[1]  Quaker Oats, Colgate, Kodak, Kellogg’s Corn Flakes, Goodyear Tire, B.F. Goodrich, and General Electric, … Continue reading media innovation doesn't change shape of ad spending distribution

historic patterns of paying for content

Compared to periodicals, newspapers have developed a business model much less propitious for profitably distributing content in a digital world.  Most of newspapers’ revenue historically has come from newspaper establishments integrated with the business of printing.  A much larger share of periodicals’ revenue has come from publishing establishments not integrated into printing.  Accounting for frequency … Continue reading historic patterns of paying for content